Introduction to Windows and Windows concepts

Introduction to Windows and Windows concepts:
What is an Operating System and basics of window
An operating system, or "OS," is software that communicates with the hardware and allows other
programs to run. It is comprised of system software, or the fundamental files your computer needs to
boot up and function. Every desktop computer, tablet, and Smartphone includes an operating system
that provides basic functionality for the device.
Introduction to Windows
The Desktop
 The desktop is the first thing you see when you log in- it is the “launch pad”
Icons, or pictures, represent programs that are available on the computer.
Notice the gray/blue task bar at the bottom of the screen.
 
Windows XP
Starts when computer is turned on
Elements of the desktop
Icon
Pointer
Desktop
Date/Time control
Taskbar
Start button
Notification area
 
 
Windows XP desktop uses a graphical user interface
Graphical user interface (GUI)
Displays icons to represent items stored on the computer
Icons: Pictures of familiar objects
Desktop
Area that appears on the screen when Windows XP starts
A workspace for projects and tools
Uses default settings when the computer is first started
Default settings: settings preset by the operating system
Appearance can be changed by the user
A pointing device
Helps the user interact with objects on the computer screen
Comes in many shapes and sizes
Mouse
Most common pointing device
 
ScreenTips
Appear when the mouse pointer is positioned over certain objects
Display the purpose or function of the object
Figure 1-3 shows a ScreenTip
Clicking
Pressing a mouse button and immediately releasing it
Menu
A list of options which can be used to perform tasks
Submenus
Start menu
Appears when the Start button is clicked
Provides access to programs, documents, etc.
 
 
Selecting
Selecting a menu command
Two possible ways of selecting objects in Windows XP
Pointing to an object
Pointing to and then clicking an object
A selected object is highlighted
 
Viewing the contents of the Recycle Bin
Click the desktop, and then point to the Recycle Bin icon. After a few moments, a ScreenTip appears
that describes the Recycle Bin
Click the left mouse button twice quickly to double-click the Recycle Bin icon. The Recycle Bin opens
 
Right-clicking
Clicking an object with the right button of the mouse
Selects an object and opens its shortcut menu
Shortcut menu: a list of options directly related to the object
 
Exploring the Start menu
 
Starting and Closing a program
Starting a program
A program must be started before it can be used
To start a program
Click the Start button
Locate and click the program’s name in the submenus
An open or running program
A program which has been started
 
Program button
Appears on the taskbar for each open program
Click to switch between open programs
Close button
Located in the upper-right corner of the program window
Click to close the program
 
Running Multiple Programs
Multitasking
Ability to run multiple programs on Windows XP at the same time
Allows the user to work on more than one project at a time
The active program is the one you are currently using
Program buttons
Located on the taskbar
Offer the easiest way to switch between programs
 
Closing Inactive Programs from the Taskbar
Options for closing a program
Use the Close button on the title bar of the program window
Use the shortcut menu associated with the program button on the taskbar
 
Using Help
Windows XP Help
Provides on-screen information about programs
Available by
Clicking the Start button and selecting Help and Support from the Start menu
Windows Help and Support Center window
Provides access to
Help files stored on the computer
Help information stored on Microsoft’s Web site
 
Using help (continued)
 
Shutting Down Windows XP
Turn Off Computer option
Located on the Start menu
Turns off the computer
Log Off option
Located on the Start menu
Logs off Windows XP but leaves the computer on
 
 The user interface
        Using Mouse and moving icons on the screen
Connect the mouse.
 
Using Mouse and moving icons on the screen (Continued)
 Hold the mouse correctly. For Windows or PC users, place your pointer finger on the left button,
   and your ring finger on the right button. If your mouse has a button or 'wheel' in the middle, your
   middle finger can operate this. For Mac users, the mouse usually has only one button. Use any of
   your three center fingers to press the button.
 To click, press the button (usually the left one, when there are two) and promptly release it. It
   should be a firm, quick tap, and the mouse should be still when you do it.
 
Using Mouse and moving icons on the screen (Continued)
 To double click (for opening applications, documents or folders), you must click (the left button)
   twice in rapid succession. If you have physical trouble with the required double click speed, your
   computer can be adjusted to suit your needs.
 
Using Mouse and moving icons on the screen (Continued)
 Moving Icons on the screen
 To drag files, press and hold the (left) button, then move the mouse without letting the button go until
 the file is where you want it to be.
 
Using Mouse and moving icons on the screen (Continued)
 Hold the mouse correctly. For Windows or PC users, place your pointer finger on the left button,
   and your ring finger on the right button. If your mouse has a button or 'wheel' in the middle, your
   middle finger can operate this. For Mac users, the mouse usually has only one button. Use any of
   your three center fingers to press the button.